Dog Anxiety (Causes, Symptoms and Remedies)

Dog Anxiety (Causes, Symptoms and Remedies)

Just like humans, dogs can be prone to chronic stress and anxiety. It can show up in many different ways, and each dog will react differently.

Separation anxiety is one of the most common problems and causes immense stress for the owner because everyone has to leave their dogs sometimes. It’s hard to know the size of the problem when it only happens when we are not around.

Travel anxiety is another common problem, we all need to be able to transport our dogs safely, even if it is just a trip to the vets.

Many dogs are terrified of fireworks and as Guy Fawkes night approaches, it is a worrying time for owners of nervous dogs. Thunderstorms can also change any dog into a nervous wreck.

Rescue dogs come with a whole host of anxieties. Ask the rescue centre what they know of the dog’s background and how they react to people, children, and other dogs. As time goes by you will learn the triggers of chronic stress and find solutions to some of their problems.

Therefore, it is crucial that you know how to recognise chronic stress. Here are some signs which may surprise you.

18  Surprising Signs of Chronic Stress in Dogs

Constant barking

Destructive Behaviour

Aggression toward people or other animals

Loss of appetite

Panting

Pacing

Crying

Howling

Trembling

Excessive Drooling

  Scratching at doors

Shaking

Yawning

Licking

Cowering

Tail tucked between legs

Diarrhea

Ears pinned back

However many of these symptoms also indicate boredom or lack of exercise.

 

Anxious Dog Remedies

My own experience of living with a highly anxious rescue dog.

Darcy was two years old when he came to us, long enough to have gained some serious mental health problems. He was terrified of anyone leaving him and would guard the front door to stop people going through it. When the visitor left he was in an extremely heightened state of chronic stress. He would cry, pace and pant for hours. I can literally feel his heart pounding against his chest.

Another thing that bothered him greatly were reflections, something else you just can’t avoid. He was obsessive about birds in the garden and still chases even the smallest ones. A squirrel can turn him completely hyperactive, eyes focused and panting hard.

Darcy would attack whenever he felt threatened which resulted in some near misses when I innocently made a swift hand movement close to him. He is still terrified of mops, brooms, vacuum cleaners, and hair dryers. If he is given the chance he will attack any that come into close proximity.

I have spoken earlier about our trip to the vets to get his toenails clipped. Not only does he have to wear his Thundershirt, but he also has to take a light sedative and be muzzled. A simple task such as toenail clipping can become a huge problem when the dog is anxious.

Despite being here for two years, in safe and secure surroundings, his problems remain.

Training has helped in some ways. Regarding his separation anxiety, we made a point of not making any sort of fuss when we left the house and no fuss whatsoever when we returned. Any visitors were told to do the same. This sounds harsh but we wanted Darcy to think that people leaving, then returning, is the most natural thing in the world, and it has worked.

Regarding other issues, his anxieties are so ingrained that I  avoid triggers whenever possible. I am always aware that he will react if he feels threatened.

I try to keep him in a quiet, relaxed atmosphere with a familiar routine. Exercise is very important for keeping him calm and expelling nervous energy. I also use hand massage on Darcy which he loves. Quiet reassurance also helps, I say ‘everything’s fine’ and Darcy seems to take that as a signal that he can start to relax.

Some people recommend a DAP  ( Dog Appeasing Pheromone) diffuser or spray. The synthetic chemical resembles the mothers smell and calms down puppies. I haven’t used this because Darcy wasn’t a puppy when we adopted him.

Classical music helps to calm down anxiety in the same way that it soothes people.

A Thundershirt is a coat which is attached firmly around the dog’s torso in a very similar way to swaddling a baby. The theory is that the tightly secured coat makes the dog feel safe. I bought one for Darcy and he is always happy for me to put it on him. He wears it for trips to the vets, on bonfire night and if we sway from our normal routine (eg Christmas or holidays) There was no miraculous cure, unfortunately.

I would say that the Thundershirt is very good for bringing levels of anxiety down but not diminishing it.

The fabric is not as thick as I expected but the velcro fasteners are good quality and the range of sizes is very good. If you wait until your dog is fully grown, measure carefully and the coat should last a lifetime. It would be good for an anxious and reactive dog on walks where traffic noise, and other dogs, can be unpredictable.

I also tried Bach Rescue Remedy (they do a pet variety )which is made from flowers and believed to help with anxiety in a natural way. The advice was to put four drops in the dogs drinking water by a lady who runs a dog rescue. She recommended it to help foster dogs settle in. I definitely think there was a change to Darcy when I gave him the drops directly from a treat.

Dog Anxiety Medication is supplied by a vet, however, it can only be given in extreme cases of chronic stress.

adap

Thundershirt for small dogs

Bach Rescue Remedy for Pets

DAP Diffuser

 

I find my own level of anxiety heightened when I had to leave Darcy at home. This Furbo Pet Camera gives me some peace of mind because I can check if he is ok on my phone and actually see for myself if he was ok.

There is a comprehensive review of the Furbo here with a 20% Discount Code if you use the link provided.

fu.jpg

 

Here are links to earlier posts which may be helpful.

Canine Massage

Darcy needs his nails cut

 

I hope you find one of the remedies listed here helpful. I know how frustrating and upsetting it is when you have an anxious dog. I am always looking for ways to help Darcy so please pass on any useful tips in the comments.

 

Thank you for reading.

 

  6 comments for “Dog Anxiety (Causes, Symptoms and Remedies)

  1. 3rd October 2017 at 6:33 pm

    Rescue Remedy is a great product! I use and have reviewed this product in one of my posts. Highly recommend!

  2. Pingback: caninebehaviour
  3. 21st December 2018 at 3:28 pm

    Thank you for this great information and perfect timing. My little guy is use to me being around all the time since I work from home and recently when I go out he gets upset and is snappy at my ankles when I try to get out the door – really odd behavior because he’s so gentle and loving otherwise so I’ve been over reacting when I leave and when I come home giving him extra attention to calm his nerves – I’m going to try to your suggestion to not make a big deal of leaving or returning so he sees it as a natural thing – BIG THANKS!!

    • waggytalesdogblog
      23rd December 2018 at 12:05 am

      I really hope it works. Its so hard to not say goodbye or make a fuss when you get home. I feel so cruel, but Darcy is much better now so it’s worth a try. Good Luck and Happy Christmas xx

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